AUDIO SPOTLIGHTING SEMINAR REPORT PDF

Single sideband amplitude modulation SSB so that the interaction between the sidebands are eliminated. Band limited LSB system should provide the best of both worlds with a potential for greater output and much more effective distortion reduction. High efficiency resonant devices remain well behaved below resonance. The low audio frequencies are at higher ultrasonic ranges and therefore have greater directivity associated with them and vice versa for high audio frequencies further helping to maintain high directivity at low audio frequencies. Utilizing the above mentioned information, it can be seen that the system that provides significant advancement is a Single Sideband Processor utilizing a square rooted envelope reference to calibrate a recursive, zero bandwidth distortion canceller operating as a lower side band modulator.

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Published on Nov 23, Abstract Audio spot lighting is a very recent technology that creates focused beams of sound similar to light beams coming out of a flashlight. It uses a combination of non-linear acoustics and some fancy mathematics.

But it is real and is fine to knock the socks of any conventional loud speaker. This acoustic device comprises a speaker that fires inaudible ultrasound pulses with very small wavelength which act in a manner very similar to that of a narrow column. The ultra sound beam acts as an airborne speaker and as the beam moves through the air gradual distortion takes place in a predictable way due to the property of non-linearity of air.

This gives rise to audible components that can be accurately predicted and precisely controlled. Both use ultrasound based solutions to beam sound into a focused beam. Audio spotlight can be either directed at a particular listener or to a point where it is reflected Introduction Audio spot lighting is a very recent technology that creates focused beams of sound similar to light beams coming out of a flashlight.

Audio spotlighting exploits the property of non-linearity of air. When inaudible ultrasound pulses are fired into the air, it spontaneously converts the inaudible ultrasound into audible sound tones, hence proved that as with water, sound propagation in air is just as non-linear, and can be calculated mathematically.

A device known as a parametric array employs the non-linearity of the air to create audible by-products from inaudible ultrasound, resulting in an extremely directive, beamlike wide-band acoustical source. This source can be projected about an area much like a spotlight, and creates an actual specialized sound distant from the transducer. The ultrasound column acts as an airborne speaker, and as the beam moves through the air, gradual distortion takes place in a predictable way.

What we need? About a half-dozen commonly used speaker types are in general use today. They range from piezoelectric tweeters that recreate the high end of the audio spectrum, to various kinds of mid-range speakers and woofers that produce the lower frequencies. Whether they be dynamic, electrostatic, or some other transducer-based design, all loudspeakers today have one thing in common: they are direct radiating-- that is, they are fundamentally a piston-like device designed to directly pump air molecules into motion to create the audible sound waves we hear.

The audible portions of sound tend to spread out in all directions from the point of origin. In fact, the beam angle of audible sound is very wide, just about degrees. This effectively means the sound that you hear will be propagated through air equally in all directions.

In order to focus sound into a narrow beam, you need to maintain a low beam angle that is dictated by wavelength. The smaller the wavelength, the less the beam angle, and hence, the more focused the sound.

Unfortunately, most of the human-audible sound is a mixture of signals with varying wavelengths—between 2 cms to 17 meters the human hearing ranges from a frequency of 20 Hz to 20, Hz. Hence, except for very low wavelengths, just about the entire audible spectrum tends to spread out at degrees.

To create a narrow sound beam, the aperture size of the source also matters—a large loudspeaker will focus sound over a smaller area. If the source loudspeaker can be made several times bigger than the wavelength of the sound transmitted, then a finely focused beam can be created. The problem here is that this is not a very practical solution. To ensure that the shortest audible wavelengths are focused into a beam, a loudspeaker about 10 meters across is required, and to guarantee that all the audible wavelengths are focused, even bigger loudspeakers are needed.

Joseph Pompei while a graduate student at MIT , who is the master brain behind the development of this technology Audio spotlight looks like a disc-shaped loudspeaker, trailing a wire, with a small laser guide-beam mounted in the middle.

But when he turns the disc away, the sound fades almost to nothing.

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Audio Spotlighting

Published on Apr 17, Abstract Audio spot lighting is a very recent technology that creates focused beams of sound similar to light beams coming out of a flashlight. It uses a combination of non-linear acoustics and some fancy mathematics. But it is real and is fine to knock the socks of any conventional loud speaker. This acoustic device comprises a speaker that fires inaudible ultrasound pulses with very small wavelength which act in a manner very similar to that of a narrow column. The ultra sound beam acts as an airborne speaker and as the beam moves through the air gradual distortion takes place in a predictable way due to the property of non-linearity of air. This gives rise to audible components that can be accurately predicted and precisely controlled.

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Audiometric Analyzer for Hearing Losses. It uses a combination of non-linear acoustics and some fancy mathematics. But it is real and is fine to knock the socks of any conventional loud speaker. This acoustic device comprises a speaker that fires inaudible ultrasound pulses with very small wavelength which act in a manner very similar to that of a narrow column. The ultra sound beam acts as an airborne speaker and as the beam moves through the air gradual distortion takes place in a predictable way due to the property of non-linearity of air. This gives rise to audible components that can be accurately predicted and precisely controlled.

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